Plant Love!

There are so many unique ways to incorporate plants into a wedding from sustainable centerpieces, to seating cards guests can bring home, to housewarming gifts for newlyweds – plants are a forever reminder of how with a little TLC, something beautiful can grow. Thanks to our friends at The Sill who curated a list of a dozen plants to add a little love to your wedding, home, or life. Why not add some greenery to your world to greet, spray, love!

Hoya Heart 

Hoya kerrii, or hoya hearts, are tropical succulent vines that are often cultivated and sold as leaf cuttings. The Hoya Heart is a succulent and thrives in bright light with infrequent waterings. It makes for a great live seating card that guests can bring home.

Philodendron 

This easy-going plant has quick-growing, trailing vines with vibrant heart-shaped leaves. The philodendron can tolerate a wide spectrum of light and prefers to be watered once every 1-2 weeks. This lovely plant gives instant lush tropical vibes to any wedding venue. 

Money Tree 

The Money Tree is a popular houseplant because of its resilience, ease of growth, and fun braided trunk. Money trees prefer bright to medium indirect light and water every 1-2 weeks.  They make great housewarming gifts, serving as omens for prosperity.

Phalaenopsis Orchid 

The phalaenopsis orchid typically blooms about once a year for up to three months with blooms available in a variety of colors. This lovely orchid prefers bright to medium indirect light, frequent waterings, and high humidity. The phalaenopsis orchid is a sustainable alternative to cut flower centerpieces that guests can bring home with them after the wedding. 

Bird of Paradise 

The lush, tropical Bird of Paradise can transform any wedding venue and transport guests to a tropical oasis. Post wedding, brides enjoy this plant in their home for many years to come. The Bird of Paradise is a bright sunny spot to call home and water every 1-2 weeks.

Air Plants 

Use these epiphytic plants to decorate the center of dining or display tables (no potting soil required). Guests can take Air Plants home post-celebration or the bride can gather them up and display in a terrarium to remember their special day. They thrive in bright indirect light with weekly soakings. 

Anthurium

Anthurium boasts being the world’s longest blooming houseplant.  Rarely without its showy blooms, you can expect these blooming beauties to look lush at your wedding no matter the time of year. They are available in a variety of colors to match any color scheme. Anthurium flourishes and blooms best in bright indirect light.

Mini Succulents 

Mini succulents are another contender for live place card settings that guests can bring home and cherish post wedding. Miniature and succulent in nature, these babies don’t require much aside from bright light and the occasional watering. These diminutive darlings are available in a handful of unique varieties, and add texture, shape, and color to any decor scheme.

Snake Plant 

Resilient and hardy, just like their union, the snake plant is the perfect housewarming gift for newlyweds. Succulent in nature, you don’t need a green thumb to keep this plant alive – simply keep in bright indirect light or lower, and only water when leaves start to wrinkle. Snake plants are great starter plant options. 

Maranta 

Nicknamed the “prayer plant”, the maranta is famous for the unique up and down movements of its dramatic foliage when the sun rises and sets. 

The maranta adds a pop of color and pattern to any home. It makes for a fantastic housewarming gift – think of the plant prayer puns! 

Echeveria 

The charming echeveria is known for its iconic rosette-shape. It is a popular choice for bridal bouquets and centerpieces. As a succulent, it can survive on little more than sunshine and the occasional watering. 

Fiddle Leaf Fig 

Another lush beauty the fiddle leaf fig transform a venue space or hold its own as a tropical centerpiece. The fiddle leaf fig can be enjoyed as a lifelong houseplant post-wedding. Keep it in bright light, and water about once every 1-2 weeks

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